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Famed Italian designer Piero Lissoni doesn’t want a boat: “I’m not crazy!” he exclaims in our Design Report interview. But where would we be without a little crazy? Certainly without superyachts like Madsummer, which waggles a dismissive finger at the modern vogue for the muted taupes, greys and beiges so often seen in today’s yacht interiors. And how about The Beast? Our “Wild Thing” cover line could equally apply to this incredible camo’d-up catamaran from New Zealand, which owner Sir Michael Hill calls “a little different”. Meanwhile, we managed finally to track down another true individualist this month – Ric Kayne, owner of the utterly unique 63.4-metre SuRi. Kayne says his converted crabbing boat is “sort of an ugly duckling”, but one that can carry an arsenal of toys, including an amphibious plane. Madsummer shares this distinction: its superstructure had to be strengthened to carry a Husky seaplane. Wouldn’t the world be so much more boring without these boats? Here’s to continued craziness.

Stewart Campbell
Editor

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